Our mission is to plant, protect, and promote trees throughout the greater Houston area.

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Our History

Founded in 1983, Trees For Houston initially focused our early efforts on planting street trees in the heart of Houston. Now celebrating our 30th anniversary, with nearly half a million trees planted, our organization has evolved into one that grows, plants and maintains thousands of trees across the greater Houston region.
 

Our purpose

In addition to street tree plantings, we've expanded our reach, which now includes a wide variety of planting projects ranging from esplanades and trails to parks and schools. 
 

Who We Serve

Our constituency is a diverse and dynamic as the city of Houston itself. By planting trees wherever they may benefit the public, we can ensure a far reaching impact throughout our region for generations to come. Much like the trees that we plant, Trees For Houston's roots are deep, firmly established and continually growing. 
 

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Trees have more benefits than you'd think.
 

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Trees Reduce Air Pollution

Trees reduce pollutants such as nitrogen oxide, carbon dioxide and particulates that trigger respiratory illnesses.

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Trees Provide Oxygen

Through the process of photosynthesis, trees provide us with the oxygen we need in order to breathe.

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Trees Reduce Stress

Exposure to nature and green space benefits our social, psychological and physical health.

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Trees Reduce Urban Heat and Home Cooling Bills

Trees help reduce temperatures (and bills) by shading buildings and concrete.

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Trees Provide Food and Habitat for Wildlife

In addition to providing shelter for wildlife, trees are a food source for many species of animals.

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Trees Reduce Storm Water Runoff and Slow Erosion

Trees absorb and clean excess rainwater through their roots, which helps hold the soil in place preventing erosion. 

 

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Wanna dig deeper?